Disclosure of Mortgage Balance to Creditor Not Prevented by PIPEDA

8061882452_a3beecc9ef_b
Royal Bank Plaza by Peter Broster (CC BY 2.0) | https://flic.kr/p/dhpfMj

This morning, the Supreme Court of Canada released its decision in Royal Bank of Canada v. Trang, 2016 SCC 50 (Trang), overturning the reasoning of two decisions of the Ontario Court of Appeal. In the SCC’s view, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, S.C. 2000 c. 5  (“PIPEDA”) does not preclude a mortgagee from producing a mortgage discharge statement to a judgment creditor. The unanimous decision, written by Justice Côté, concluded that such disclosure was in accordance with an order made by a court or, alternatively, that the mortgagors had provided implied consent.

Continue reading “Disclosure of Mortgage Balance to Creditor Not Prevented by PIPEDA”

Baseball and Privacy: A Canadian Perspective on Wearable Technologies

Two recent articles have highlighted a novel privacy issue regarding the legal implications of wearable technologies in Major League Baseball (MLB). Rian Watt first addressed the issue for Vice Sports, and Associate Professor Nathaniel Grow followed up with a post on Fangraphs about the American implications of MLB franchises collecting biometric data about their players. However, given that the Toronto Blue Jays operate in Canada, a perspective on this from north of the border is warranted.

Continue reading “Baseball and Privacy: A Canadian Perspective on Wearable Technologies”